Should we ‘out’ Bitcoin creator, Satoshi?

Everyone likes a good mystery. After all, who isn’t fascinated with Sherlock Holmes or the Hardy Boys? The thirst to explore a mystery led us to the New World, to the ocean depths and into space.

One of the great mysteries of the past decade is the identity of Satoshi Nakamoto, the inventor of Bitcoin and the blockchain. Some have even stepped forward in an effort to usurp his identity for fame, infamy or fortune. But in this case, we have a mystery in which the subject does not wish to be fingered. He prefers anonymity.

This raises an interesting question. What could be achieved by discovering or revealing the identity of the illusive Satoshi Nakamoto?…

The blockchain and Bitcoin present radically transformative methodologies with far ranging, beneficial impact on business, transparency and social order.

How so? — The blockchain demonstrates that we can crowd-source trust, while Bitcoin is much more than a payment mechanism or even a reserve currency. It decouples governments from monetary policy. Ultimately, this will benefit consumers, businesses and even the governments that lose that control.

Why Has Satoshi Remained Anonymous?

I believe that Satoshi remains anonymous, because his identity, history, interests and politics would be a distraction to the fundamental gift that his research has bestowed. The world is still grappling with the challenge of education, adoption, scaling, governance, regulation and volatility.

Some people are still skeptical of Bitcoin’s potential or they fail to accept that it carries intrinsic value (far more than fiat currency, despite the absence of a redemption guaranty). Additionally, we are still witnessing hacks, failing exchanges and ICO scams. Ignorance is rampant. Some individuals wonder if Satoshi is an anarchist—or if his invention is criminal. (Of course, it is not!).

Outing him now is pointless. He is a bright inventor, but he is not the story. The concepts and coin that he gave us are still in their infancy. Our focus now must be to understand, scale and smooth out the kinks, so that adoption and utility can serve mankind.

Related Ruminations:

Ellery Davies co-chairs CRYPSA, publishes A Wild Duck, hosts the New York Bitcoin Event and kicked off the Cryptocurrency Expo in Dubai. Click Here to inquire about a live presentation or consulting engagement.

Stellar & Ripple: Pretender to Bitcoin throne?

You might know that I am a board member and co-chairperson of CRYPSA, the Cryptocurrency Standards Association. (I write this Blog under a pen name). The organization is brand neutral. That is, we don’t endorse or favor one particular coin over another. Think of CRYPSA standards as the security paper onto which money is printed. The paper can be used for Dollars, Yen and Zlotties. If it prevents counterfeiting then any currency can benefit. Like security paper, the standards we create and the safe practices we promote apply equally to all cryptocurrencies.

But, as with any user network, recognition, adoption and gravitas count! It’s no secret that Bitcoin is the elephant in the room. It is by far the biggest, baddest and most reported new age coin by any yardstick.


Dollars & cents? Ripple Labs unit = XRP

But Bitcoin has a problem—at least that’s what fifty start up companies want us to believe. The code that validates transactions (also used to mine coins) is transaction bound and hampered by original design. Moreover, alt coin entrepreneurs make a persuasive case for new features that more fully exploit the block chain potential.

Wild Ducks may know of Litecoin, Feathercoin, Dogecoin and Mastercoin, but there are even newer coins attracting the eyes of the crypto and investment community. If you have your ear to the ground, the smart money seems to be betting on digital currency coined by Stellar and by Ripple Labs. The rival companies share an eclectic and storied founder and they are both headquartered in San Francisco.

The New York Observer offers an illustrated history and analysis of the two pretenders in the novel-like style of Wired Magazine. They call it The Race to Replace Bitcoin.

Wow! In my humble opinion, this is a great article! I will assume that you have perused it. Very little recap here—just a Wild Duck commentary and analysis…

Ripple-1Ripple and Stellar co-founder Jed McCaleb has a history. He founded eDonkey, a Napster-like service of the early p2p era and Mt. Gox, the big Bitcoin exchange that collapsed in a spectacular and still-mysterious failure. Another co-founder, Sam Yagan also survived eDonkey and OK Cupid. He is now CEO of dating behemoth,

Stelar-1aI know some of the other players, but hadn’t realized that Ripple Labs was making waves (pun intended). McCaleb’s newer venture, Stellar, claims to represent more than just a coin. It is a monetary ecosystem that inter-operates across currencies and boundaries. (Isn’t that what Bitcoin does? It seems that I have a lot to learn)…

I have less programming expertise than these geniuses, and possible less cryptography expertise. But I can outdistance their collective chops on macro economics.

Wild Duck Analysis

It is exceedingly unlikely that any venture will create the next cryptocurrency by design, unless the new coin is directly tied to and sanctioned by a believable and uncontested legacy of Bitcoin prime. In effect, a new coin must be a fork of the original code or at least a proper heir with blood lines and public trust.

Ripple Labs and Stellar have a very bright team. I don’t doubt the need to improve on the Bitcoin protocol, perhaps even with a wholly new technical approach. But the string of failures in McCaleb’s background, the mystery surrounding the first 1.5 billion STRs, and the daffy distribution scheme with Facebook are almost deal killers. This needn’t be an epitaph. There is a path to righteousness…

Cryptocurrency is already hard for the public to understand and harder to accept. For this reason, an heir to Bitcoin needs five things to succeed:

  1. Direct ties to the ownership of all original BTC
  2. Sanctioned by top Bitcoin developers AND blessed by Satoshi in a signed email
  3. The coin must be ZERO growth. It must never fall prey to inflationary economics. It accommodates a growing base and users and transactions by slicing the pie thinner (or ‘mining’ from a capped pool)—never by creating coins out of thin air.
  4. Source code that is transparent, open and without proprietary interests.
  5. A unshakeable commitment to continued decentralization and p2p operation with no mandatory reporting of anything (identities, or anything about transaction beyond date, pseudo-anonymous wallet ID and amount). In short, there must be no authority and no requisite bookkeeping beyond the open and distributed block chain.

There you have it: Our unofficial CRYPSA manifesto of what it takes to dethrone Bitcoin. In short, a successful replacement must be no less than Bitcoin 2. It elevates Bitcoin to the status of emeritus, because it respects the equity of early adopters (and without watering down with ‘newly created shares’)—and it must provably disavow any potential for inflation or manipulation.

Ellery Davies is a founder and board member of CRYPSA. He is also chief editor at

Related: Could Bitcoin be Dethroned by an Altcoin